Calendar

Apr
28
Tue
“Changing Season” Documentary at LA Asian Pacific Film Festival @ Japanese American National Museum
Apr 28 @ 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm

“Changing Season” goes to LA, Masumotos will be there for Q&A

 

Venture out to the Masumoto Farm – eighty acres of prime, peach-growing orchards – where seven varieties of the sweet juicy fruit are cultivated to sun-kissed perfection by a dynamic father-and-daughter team of David “Mas” and Nikiko Masumoto. Director Jim Choi succinctly captures this underrepresented facet of the CA farming industry about an Asian American family-run business, three generations strong, which in turn presents us with the changing idea of the American Dream. At a talk at their alma mater, UC Berkeley, Mas and Nikiko communicate eloquently about the family legacy and the meaning of land ownership and sustainability. “My family taught me to have a hunger for memories, not a nostalgia for the past,” offers the elder Mas, while his millennial daughter notes the significance of her grandfather’s bold decision in literally “planting roots in a country that didn’t want him.” The family business, which father and daughter vigilantly maintain today, was born from the WWII-internment era, when Japanese Americans lost not only their property, civil rights, and freedoms – but most importantly, their dignity as members of a thriving immigrant community in the United States.

Author of seven books and former chair of the California Council for the Humanities, Mas cuts a distinctive figure: part child of the counterculture, part social justice-driven business entrepreneur, and part artist- philosopher. And indeed, the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree, in the highly self-aware, activist-minded, prodigal daughter who returns from the city to take over the reins from him. Aided by wife-mother Marcy, a school administrator by day, and younger son-brother, Korio, Mas and Nikiko toil on in the face of economic downturn, ongoing water drought, and contemporary forms of discrimination. An inspiring look into the ever- evolving negotiation of national, cultural, racial, and gender identities.

— Lindy Leong

Apr
29
Wed
“Changing Season” Documentary at LA Asian Pacific Film Festival @ Japanese American National Museum
Apr 29 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

“Changing Season” goes to LA, Masumotos will be there for Q&A

 

Venture out to the Masumoto Farm – eighty acres of prime, peach-growing orchards – where seven varieties of the sweet juicy fruit are cultivated to sun-kissed perfection by a dynamic father-and-daughter team of David “Mas” and Nikiko Masumoto. Director Jim Choi succinctly captures this underrepresented facet of the CA farming industry about an Asian American family-run business, three generations strong, which in turn presents us with the changing idea of the American Dream. At a talk at their alma mater, UC Berkeley, Mas and Nikiko communicate eloquently about the family legacy and the meaning of land ownership and sustainability. “My family taught me to have a hunger for memories, not a nostalgia for the past,” offers the elder Mas, while his millennial daughter notes the significance of her grandfather’s bold decision in literally “planting roots in a country that didn’t want him.” The family business, which father and daughter vigilantly maintain today, was born from the WWII-internment era, when Japanese Americans lost not only their property, civil rights, and freedoms – but most importantly, their dignity as members of a thriving immigrant community in the United States.

Author of seven books and former chair of the California Council for the Humanities, Mas cuts a distinctive figure: part child of the counterculture, part social justice-driven business entrepreneur, and part artist- philosopher. And indeed, the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree, in the highly self-aware, activist-minded, prodigal daughter who returns from the city to take over the reins from him. Aided by wife-mother Marcy, a school administrator by day, and younger son-brother, Korio, Mas and Nikiko toil on in the face of economic downturn, ongoing water drought, and contemporary forms of discrimination. An inspiring look into the ever- evolving negotiation of national, cultural, racial, and gender identities.

— Lindy Leong